The Story of Wall Fountains

As the leader of the Catholic Church, the scholarly Pope Nicholas V (1397-1455} decided to mandate translations of important books from their original Greek into Latin. Making the city into the deserving capital of the Christian community was important to him, so he also took steps to beautify it. The decaying Roman aqueduct which had carried fresh drinking water in the into the capital city from countless miles away was restored beginning in 1453 at his request. Nicholas V also revived the Roman convention of installing grand fountains, referred to as mostras, to mark the end point of the aqueduct. At his behest, the architect Leon Battista Alberti undertook the construction of a wall fountain in the place where the magnificent Trevi Fountain now stands. 94-905-13901__38686.jpg The aqueduct he had rebuilt included modifications and extensions which eventually allowed it to supply the necessary water to the Trevi Fountain as well as the famed baroque fountains in the Piazza del Popolo and the Piazza Navona.

Statues As a Staple of Vintage Art in Archaic Greece

The first freestanding sculpture was designed by the Archaic Greeks, a notable accomplishment since until then the sole carvings in existence were reliefs cut into walls and pillars. Most of these freestanding sculptures were what is known as kouros figures, statues of young, attractive male or female (kore) Greeks. The kouroi, considered by the Greeks to exemplify beauty, had one foot extended out of a strict forward-facing pose and the male figurines were regularly undressed, with a strong, sturdy physique. Life-sized versions of the kouroi appeared beginning in 650 BC. During the Archaic period, a big time of change, the Greeks were evolving new sorts of government, expressions of art, and a greater comprehension of people and cultures outside Greece. Equivalent to many other moments of historical conflict, disagreements were common, and there were struggles between city-states like The Arcadian wars, the Spartan invasion of Samos.

Acqua Vergine: The Solution to Rome's Water Problems

Aqua Anio Vetus, the first raised aqueduct founded in Rome, started supplying the men and women living in the hills with water in 273 BC, even though they had depended on natural springs up until then. Outside of these aqueducts and springs, wells and rainwater-collecting cisterns were the lone techniques around at the time to supply water to spots of high elevation. In the very early 16th century, the city began to make use of the water that ran underground through Acqua Vergine to supply water to Pincian Hill. Throughout the length of the aqueduct’s passage were pozzi, or manholes, that gave access. Although they were originally manufactured to make it possible to service the aqueduct, Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi started out using the manholes to get water from the channel, opening when he obtained the property in 1543.

Apparently, the rainwater cistern on his property wasn’t good enough to fulfill his needs. That is when he decided to create an access point to the aqueduct that ran beneath his residence.

Where did Large Outdoor Fountains Originate from?

A water fountain is an architectural piece that pours water into a basin or jets it high into the air in order to provide drinking water, as well as for decorative purposes.

Pure functionality was the original role of fountains. Cities, towns and villages made use of nearby aqueducts or springs to provide them with potable water as well as water where they could bathe or wash. Up to the late nineteenth century, water fountains had to be near an aqueduct or reservoir and more elevated than the fountain so that gravity could make the water flow down or shoot high into the air. Fountains were not only utilized as a water source for drinking water, but also to adorn homes and celebrate the artist who created it. The main materials used by the Romans to build their fountains were bronze or stone masks, mostly depicting animals or heroes.

To illustrate the gardens of paradise, Muslim and Moorish garden planners of the Middle Ages introduced fountains to their designs. Fountains enjoyed a significant role in the Gardens of Versailles, all part of French King Louis XIV’s desire to exert his power over nature. Seventeen and 18 century Popes sought to extol their positions by adding beautiful baroque-style fountains at the point where restored Roman aqueducts arrived into the city.

Indoor plumbing became the main source of water by the end of the 19th century thereby restricting urban fountains to mere decorative elements. Gravity was replaced by mechanical pumps in order to permit fountains to bring in clean water and allow for beautiful water displays.

Nowadays, fountains adorn public spaces and are used to pay tribute to individuals or events and fill recreational and entertainment needs.

Garden Fountains: The Perfect Decor Accessory to Find Serenity

Your state of mind is positively influenced by having water in your yard. The loud noises in your community can be masked by the delicate sounds of a fountain. Consider this the place where can you go to recreate yourself and become one with nature. Bodies of water such as seas, oceans and rivers are commonly used in water therapies, as they are regarded as therapeutic. So if you desire a little piece of heaven nearby, a pond or fountain in your own garden is the answer.


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Early Water Delivery Solutions in Rome
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