The Benefits of Indoor Wall Water Features

For Countless years now, hospitals and health care facilities have utilized interior fountains to establish a stressless, serene setting. The relaxing effect of flowing water can be conducive to a contemplative state.

Faster healing is thought to be induced by indoor fountains as well. A number of sicknesses are thought to get better with their use, as such they are recommended by physicians and mental health therapists. The calming, melodic sound of flowing water is thought to help those with PTSD and acute insomnia. win826__27441.jpg

According to various reviews, having an wall fountain inside your home may lead to a higher level of well-being and security. The sight and sound of water are essential to the survival of the human species and planet earth.

Feng-shui is an ancient philosophy which asserts that water is one of two basic elements in our lives which has the ability to transform us. The main tenets of feng-shui state that we can achieve serenity and harmony by harmonizing the interior elements in our surroundings. We should have the element of water somewhere in our home. Putting a fountain in front of your home or near your entrance is ideal.

If you are looking for a water wall that best suits your families’ needs think about one of the many types available including a mounted waterfall, a stand-alone water feature or a custom-built fountain. Based on the results of numerous research studies, people who have a fountain in a central room are thought to be more content, satisfied, and carefree than those who do not have one.

What Are Outdoor Water fountains Made From?

While today’s garden fountains are made in a range of materials, most are made from metal. Metallic fountains, with their clean lines and sculptural accents, come in in a variety of metals and can accommodate any style or budget. The interior design of your house should establish the look and feel of your yard and garden as well.

One of the most common metals for sculptural garden fountains these days is copper. Copper is trendy for both inside and outside use and is widely found in tabletop and cascade fountains, among others. If you opt to go with copper, your fountain can be any style from fun and whimsical to contemporary.

If you are drawn to more conventional -looking water fountains, brass is probably for you. Even though they are a bit old-fashioned, brass fountains are quite widespread because they often include interesting artwork.

Of all the metals, stainless steel is viewed as the most contemporary-looking. If you select a cutting-edge steel design, both the value and tranquility of your garden will get a nice lift. As with all fountains, you can find any size you need.

Fiberglass is a popular material for fountains because you can get the look and feel of metal at a much lower price, and it is lighter and easier to move than metal. Keeping a fiberglass water fountain clean and working correctly is quite easy, another aspect consumers like.

A Peek into the Roots of Fountains

As the head of the Catholic Church, the scholarly Pope Nicholas V (1397-1455} decided to commission translations of important writings from their original Greek into Latin. Turning the city into the worthy capital of the Christian world was important to him, so he also took steps to enhance it. Beginning in 1453, the ruined Aqua Vergine, an ancient Roman aqueduct which had brought clean drinking water into the city from many miles away, underwent reconstruction at the bidding of the Pope. Nicholas V also resurrected the Roman custom of installing grand fountains, known as mostras, to mark the end point of the aqueduct. The architect Leon Battista Alberti was instructed by him to put up a wall fountain where we now find the breath-taking Trevi Fountain. The Trevi Fountain as well as the renowned baroque fountains situtated in the Piazza Navona and the Piazza del Popolo were eventually supplied with water from the altered, rebuilt aqueduct.

The First Garden Water Features

The water from rivers and other sources was originally delivered to the citizens of nearby communities and cities via water fountains, whose design was primarily practical, not aesthetic. The force of gravity was the power supply of water fountains up until the close of the 19th century, using the forceful power of water traveling downhill from a spring or brook to squeeze the water through spigots or other outlets. Frequently used as monuments and commemorative edifices, water fountains have inspired travelers from all over the globe throughout the ages. The common fountains of today bear little similarity to the first water fountains. Designed for drinking water and ceremonial functions, the first fountains were simple carved stone basins. Stone basins as fountains have been discovered from 2000 BC.

Early fountains put to use in ancient civilizations relied on gravity to regulate the circulation of water through the fountain. The location of the fountains was influenced by the water source, which is why you’ll normally find them along aqueducts, waterways, or streams. Fountains with decorative Gods, mythological monsters, and creatures began to show up in Rome in about 6 B.C., crafted from stone and bronze. The remarkable aqueducts of Rome provided water to the spectacular public fountains, most of which you can travel to today.

Where did Large Outdoor Fountains Begin?

The incredible construction of a fountain allows it to provide clean water or shoot water high into air for dramatic effect and it can also serve as an excellent design feature to enhance your home.

The main purpose of a fountain was originally strictly practical. Water fountains were linked to a spring or aqueduct to provide drinkable water as well as bathing water for cities, townships and villages. Until the late nineteenth, century most water fountains operated using gravity to allow water to flow or jet into the air, therefore, they needed a source of water such as a reservoir or aqueduct located higher than the fountain. Fountains were not only used as a water source for drinking water, but also to adorn homes and celebrate the designer who created it. Roman fountains often depicted images of animals or heroes made of bronze or stone masks. Muslims and Moorish landscaping designers of the Middle Ages included fountains to re-create smaller models of the gardens of paradise. To demonstrate his prominence over nature, French King Louis XIV included fountains in the Garden of Versailles. Seventeen and 18 century Popes sought to extol their positions by including beautiful baroque-style fountains at the point where restored Roman aqueducts arrived into the city.

Urban fountains built at the end of the 19th century served only as decorative and celebratory adornments since indoor plumbing provided the essential drinking water. The introduction of unique water effects and the recycling of water were two things made possible by swapping gravity with mechanical pumps.

Modern fountains are used to adorn community spaces, honor individuals or events, and enhance recreational and entertainment events.


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The Roman academic Pope Nicholas V (1397-1455) decided to have hundreds of historic Greek books translated into Latin. He also initiated the embellishment of the city to make it into the worthy seat of the Christian world. The damaged Roman aqueduct... read more